The Righteous Mind

In an attempt to better understand the struggle that every election involves I chose to read Jonathan Haidt’s “The Righteous Mind”. I admit that this exhaustive treatment of why and how people sort themselves out has helped me in my effort to make sense of what appears most of the time to be nonsense. He helped me see the value of each orientation such as  liberal/conservative and how they each have strengths and weaknesses.  We need each other to become whole, but have fallen into the either/or trap that the gospels warns us  to avoid.  Watching the “news” will become a more instructive exercise since reading this book. A current article that expands on this subject. For an interview with the author click on this link

Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself

Dr. Joe Dispenza has explored the implication on how we can use the new knowledge of brain studies to “lose your mind and create a new one” in this work published in 2012 called Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself. He takes us further into the practical ways that we can move from a more instinctual way of being in the world to a more conscious one. He shows how knowledge without experience is merely philosophy; experience without knowledge is ignorance. He helps us to see how we can unmemorize our self-limiting emotions and move to wisdom. The book ends with practical methods of using meditation to achieve these goals.

Mind in the Balance

If you are interested in the interface between Christianity and Buddhism in the dialogue between science and religion, this may be the book for you. Mind in the Balance examines the history of meditation in both these traditions of belief. B. Alan Wallace explores the subject of mind, intelligence, spirit and reason. His  insights from modern science helps to engage those who feel that they are “spiritual” but not “religious”.