What do we do with the Bible?

What do we do with the Bible? Is a 64 page book by Richard Rohr packed with easy to assimilate truths about reading the bible. It should rest alongside your favorite translation and be a companion as you take time to be present to the Word. Fr. Rohr, in plain language, unlocks the treasures by freeing you of the need to use it to prove you are right or in control. The Sneaky Spirit emerges as you give yourself to an honest engagement, not unlike when you approach another person as a gift to unwrap. Try it, trust me, you will like it.

http://theark1.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/What-do-we-do-with-the-Bible.docx

The Cities that built the Bible

Getting the context of an author is especially important when studying the bible. Archaeologist Robert Cargill of the Univ. of Iowa has given his life to studying and teaching this context for those of us who come to the bible for inspiration.  I will be coming back often to ponder this work as I also teach and write. Learning more about the struggles and customs of the people who composed and then saved these works can help us move more profitably into these timeless works of love. Written in 2016 and published by Harper/Collins.

The Strange Woman

 The Strange Woman by Gail Corrington Streete. Louisville, Ky. Westminster John Knox Press. 1977.
When we know how something came into being, and the part it played in the survival of those who wrote the bible, we can than use this insight to move into our new reality with greater survival skills. This book will help you to understand how power and sex became so influential in the formation of the bible. We then can be free to go into the future, standing on the shoulders of those who blazed the trails for us, grateful for what we have been given, and better able to give to those who come after us.

When Jesus Became God

When Jesus Became God by Richard E. Rubenstein In the three hundred-year period after the Resurrection, it must have been terribly difficult to make sense of all the conflicting claims about Jesus in the very early churches. No agreed upon form of the Bible yet existed. Creeds were being hammered out amidst murder and mayhem even among the bishops, and the struggles for safety from hostile neighbors was ever present. Rubenstein’s very approachable book is a wealth of information about this creative and dangerous time. The sub-title says it succinctly: “The Epic Fight over Christ’s Divinity in the Last Days of Rome”. I think you will find this book very interesting.