Hidden Transcripts and the Arts of Resistance

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Hidden Transcripts and the Arts of Resistance edited by Richard A Horsley made me reflect more deeply on the process of coming to consciousness of human awareness and its inter-relatedness in a new and deeper way. The more conscious a living being becomes the more impervious it is to being dominated. Historically, this has taken the form of ‘hidden resistance’ in order to survive and pass life on to the next generation. Paradoxically, just being alive becomes the vector through which the next generation has the chance to resist domination on to its heirs. The process of become fully conscious is fraught with many trials and errors as all evolution necessarily does. But in order for consciousness to continue to grow aware of its unique self, the more insistent the need to reject domination becomes. I see glimmers of light every now and then, that the domination model is outliving its usefulness. Slowly the dominant are realizing the inherent value of life, in all its forms, and acknowledging its interdependence on everything created and coming into being. This calls the question of the value of the current system. Does having control, ultimately delude us into thinking we are in control, only to crash on the rocks of a serious illness or implosion of the environment? We are beginning to question our assumptions. Unfortunately, we only do that in time of needing that environment or help to recover from that illness. Those who know they are not in control, which included all of us at birth, are then free to notice what all religions in their healthiest expressions have been trying to teach us. That all who exist do so at the behest of a reality that chose to create them, and that reality seems to care about this creation. When we come to the consciousness of this process, we will have become fully who we are created to be.

Grace

Grace: On the Journey to God

Michael Casey once again is a faithful guide for the journey we all are on to God. On the last page Casey writes; “There is a grace and energy; at work carrying us upward that does not stem from our own limited resources.” This energy/grace can be explored chapter by chapter. He reflects on discontinuity, desire, humanity, alternation, temptation, self-knowledge, petition, dedication, contemplation, faith, revelation, leisure, silence, community and communion. Reflecting deeply in the ways God engages us in all these aspects of our lives in order to guide us to our destiny in God.

The Universal Christ

The Universal Christ

This is Richard Rohr’s latest and greatest book. I have found him a mentor for many years and it seems like he is offering us the fruits of his mature tree in this work. Few can reflect on their experiences with the insights and clarity that this dear Franciscan friar does. His subtitle: How a forgotten reality can change everything we see, hope for, and believe. On pages 212-3 you will find: “Authentic Christianity is not so much a belief system as a life-and-death system that shows you how to give away your life, how to give away your love, and eventually how to give away your death. Basically, how to give away-and in doing so, to connect with the world, with all other creatures, and with God.” I think this sums up how and why Richard wrote this book now. He is giving away all he has to us here. The paradox comes when we discover in giving away we create the space to receive. I have received much in this gift. So will you.

Domination and the Arts of Resistance

Domination and the Arts of Resistance

James C Scott in his penetrating examination of domination and it historic precedents in Domination and the Arts of Resistance published in 1990 has captured my attention for these past days. He carefully examines the ways that the abuse of power has been more or less successfully dealt with down through the ages. Even though his work seems to reflect a past era, it appears to me timeless. It also highlights how the overthrow of oppression often ushers in the new oppressor, who under the guise of liberator captures the good will of the newly freed only to erect the new form of oppression. It reminds me of a well-meaning friend who heroically attempts to solve a friend’s problem, only to discover that solving the problem was not really the issue. Staying the center of attention was really the issue of the “friend”. While diligently applying talent, time and treasure to solve the current problem, the person needing the attention was just as diligently creating new problems to be solved, sometime even at the expense of pain for themselves, because the real issue was their need for attention at any cost. Once that was seen, the well-meaning person/citizen withdraws from the futile attempts thereby freeing energy and resources to develop real problem solving responses. I feel that a close reading of this book might be a liberating experience today. In these times of cell phones, internet, texting and who knows what else will be available in the future, we, once freed from our illusions of domination might actually meet the real needs of our time. “Mother nature” will have the ultimate say. “She” isn’t influenced by the old “they who have the gold make the rules’ standard. No amount of gold will provide the necessary conditions for my great grandchildren to live humane lives if clean air and water are unavailable. So I now wear diaper pins to remind myself that every choice I make they will have to live (or not be able to live) with. I plan to have extras in my pocket to give to those who ask why the pin. At 82, it is my form of resistance so aptly outlined in this penetrating work of James C. Scott. Get your library to find it for you. It might provoke a lot of interesting reflections for you too.

That Good Night

Oh how I wish Dr. Sunita Puri has written That Good Night when I was a resident at the Univ. of IA Hosp. & Clinics back in 1979. It grew out of my need to answer a question. When returning to the hospital after a weekend often patients with life limiting conditions had been discharged and I wondered what would happen to them. That led me to wonder with others and ensued our effort to create a home care hospice in the early 1980’s when hospice was a new idea in this country.  As I immersed myself in her memories, my own memories came flooding back. When I read that the American Board of Medical Specialties didn’t recognize hospice and palliative medicine as s distinct medical sub-specialty until 2006 a lot of my questions began to make sense. Seeing from behind her eyes helped me to see how difficult modern medicine is for people whose whole identity is to fix things. At some level I knew this, but at another level it seemed unreal. On my first night as a resident chaplain I distinctly remember the terror I felt as my pager went off and I headed down the long darkened hall toward what I hoped was the right direction. At the end of the hall I could see the shape of someone and I imagined it to be the Spirit and found myself mentally shouting “I will had you what I can reach.” This moment of truth, for someone short enough to spend a lot of time asking people to reach things for me, freed me to enter into the chaos that awaited me. As long as I truly handed to those in need whatever I could reach, I could fail and still come out OK.  Dr. Puri says this in so many eloquent ways there would be no way to list them all. As medical options become ever more complex, the questions of what should be done become ever more difficult. I hope that all people walking the paths with patients might find this book and bring her wisdom into their lives. It is interesting that her whole lifetime is the very length of time I have been invited to share the struggles of patients and their families. In a way I feel like Simeon in Luke’s gospel saying “Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word: for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence on all people, a light for revelation to the (caregivers) Gentiles and for glory to your people Israel.” Luke 2: 29-32.

A Disarming Spirit

A Disarming Spirit by Frank Fromherz is a very timely book. It is a study of one person and his ongoing struggle to live his truth and how it can make a difference. If you were to want a biography written about your life, you would hope it would be with the care and attention to detail that Frank gives to Bp. Hunthausen. He walks us through how one person accepts their truth with integrity and courage. Like any of us who starts out in life discovering our path step by step, often finding the way after many trials and errors, “Dutch” accepts each step with prayerful attention. We would hope that we too would be remembered for the quiet and sometimes heroic choices we make in the name of love. Love for the truth, a healthy self-love, resulting in love for others. “Dutch’s” details are unique to him, as are each of ours. Reading this book will give anyone encountering it a model of how to do it too. In these chaotic times it is becoming ever more important to give each other our best, even if we like “Dutch” won’t live to see our hopes materialize. But if someone writes our story someday, let us hope that someone cares enough to tell it as comprehensively at Frank, so we can add our truth to the world story.

What Truth Sounds Like

Through the gift of C SPAN I was introduced to Michael Eric Dyson’s “What Truth Sounds Like. I confronted my unconscious racism as I read his examination of the reality of white privilege. Part of that privilege was the freedom to fall in love with a young black man and eventually be able to call him son. His biological parents welcomed us into their family with loving grace and considered our other sons theirs as well. This was possible because they were not afflicted with the inherited disease of racism. Eventually another son was privileged to adopt a foster child who is black who they fell in love with. I came to see that my white privilege gave our family the freedom to love in ways that not only didn’t ‘cost’ us anything, but enriched us beyond measure. Given all that it appears to me from our experience that only love is the answer. More details seem only to obstruct our meeting each other in our uniqueness’s. Convincing others with facts only seems to harden resistance. We watch others confront their unconscious resistance when they have to accept our choices to love. They too find themselves loving our children and grandchildren because they love us. Dyson finds this truth every now and then as he plumbs the depth of people who have decided to love someone who challenges the ugly reality of white privilege. Racism is a “genetic” disease of people who inherited a fatal flaw. The sooner we find a cure for it the better we will all be. In a sobering article on the origin of hate titled The Pathology of Prejudice I learned a lot of how this genetic disease is passed on. It is worth reading. My only suggestion for Dyson is a word change in the title. I would suggest What Truth FEELS Like. This is my take away from spending time with his valuable examination of what is holding us back.

The Universe Story Calendar

The Universe Story Calendar by Thomas R. Spiritbringer is a mind bending read that can expand your consciousness even as the universe itself is expanding.  In the attempt to tell the story AS OF TODAY this book with its companion calendar reaches to include all times, places, and peoples. Unlike previous stories whose focus on the recurring events, such as the seasons, phases of the moon and planets, this book and calendar highlights that there is never a recurring anything. All is ever new. Nothing stays the same. This is especially significant in the human who is the most recent event in the cosmic story. We reach to tell the story to our young that excites their imaginations while emphasizing how significant each of them are to the story. This is a reference book. One that you will want to have at hand as you try to explain to yourself and others how we came to what we know AS OF TODAY. All previous attempts to talk about time are explained and the reasons they were changed listed. We are now invited to once again change with what we know AS OF TODAY. In this graceful and humble acknowledgement that this is all we know we will reverence the creative process and our ability to know our place in that process.

A Higher Loyalty

A Higher Loyalty by James Comey was an interesting read. What did I learn? Not much about the details of the struggle as they have been extensively chronicled by the many news outlets. But I did learn how much those like Comey give to all of us just being in the various law enforcement agencies sworn to protect our freedom. I also experienced to a degree that surprised me the awareness of how much we put on the shoulders of others what we should be carrying  ourselves.  As long as they are doing “their jobs” I can go about my life not concerned about the Constitution or the freedoms it provides. But Comey shares with all of us that this comes at great cost to many. They cannot do it alone.  We, and I, need to do our part as well. Time will tell if we are up to our jobs, and if we are worthy of the commitments so many make on our behalf. The book ends on the hope that like a forest fire that clears the way for new growth previously hampered by the overgrowth of the old trees. I look to the youth of today to grow into that role. Now it is our turn to sort out what is true and give our energies to that same truth so that the young will trust that it is worth their lives.

Broken Lives

Konrad H. Jarausch has given us the fruit of his labors in his attempt to share how ordinary Germans experienced the 20th century in his book Broken Lives. It was described as “The gripping stories of ordinary Germans who lived through World War II, the Holocaust, and Cold War partition―but also recovery, reunification, and rehabilitation.” I went in search to see if he could help me deal with my sense that we are standing on the edge of a cliff these days in the choices we are either making or not making. My question is, how a culture could be drawn into a systemic series of death dealing choices? He used the diaries, documents and much more to weave a story of ordinary and extraordinary people reacting to the hardships and humiliations of WW1. He then composes an engrossing story of how men, women and children made sense of their experiences by quoting from those recovered texts.

On page 280“ I found this quote that seems to speak to my search and question: “Still in high school, Ursula Mahlendorf “shared with my classmates a fundamental distrust of all adults” who were responsible for the German catastrophe. ln heated exchanges with her favorite teacher, “I accused his whole generation I articulated my age groups feeling of having been shortchanged by our elders and of being berated for what they had failed to teach us.” Similarly, theology student Erich Helmer voiced his cohort’s “search for answers to the questions: What can still be believed? What is solid after the ground of reality has and is continuing to cave in everywhere?” I sense our youth in their marches, voter registration drives and much more are demanding to be heard now. We too now have to choose wisely so not to repeat the 20th century mistakes that brought so much suffering.

I invite you to read this book. It could help you to reflect on things in a deeper way. It must have taken the author many years to discover all these documents let alone construct the story in such a way to share the humanity of those whose worlds he shares with us. But somehow he seems to perceive that we need these insights NOW.

Less Than Fully Catholic

Less than Fully Catholic is written by a friend of mine Trisha Day. She warned me that I might be offended by some of what she wrote, but I can assure you I not only was not offended by more importantly challenged. We share the ‘cradle Catholic’ experience which entailed swallowing many gizzard stones.

In my Dominican training we were introduced to what is called “gizzard” preaching. Preaching that reveals that what we have to share is put through the process that the gizzard does to food a creature ingests that needs grinding up in order to be assimilated. Then it is passed on to the rest of the digestive system to nourish the entire system. Trisha had done this for us.

She has taken those things she ingested as a child of faith and processed them in the gizzard of her life experiences. Like many today she finds that those things that sustained her grandparents were not nurturing her. Those same things became her gizzard stones. Her vast reservoir of reading and reflecting on the meaning of life have been run through her gizzard and she produces a ‘gizzard homily’ that will nourish all honest seekers.

We live in times that challenge most of what we think we know. Be it how everything came to be to what everything is destined to become. No generation before us has had to deal with the paradigm shifts we in one generation confront. Unless we like Trisha deal honestly with these questions we could drop the ball that literally “keeps the game going”.

So potential reader, if you define Catholic as an Adjective which the dictionary includes:

all-around (also all-round), all-purpose, general, general-purpose, unlimited, unqualified, unrestricted, unspecialized you might join me  and put Trisha at the heart of what it truly means to be catholic for our troubled times. She has given us a truly nourishing meal. Enjoy.

Race and the Cosmos

Race and Cosmos by Barbara A. Holmes

You can find her in  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoLyeSPN_sk and http://www.openhorizons.org/barbara-holmes-a-mentor-for-our-times.html

In reviewing this powerful book I let the author speak for herself. On page172 she says:

It is nothing short of a miracle to be situated in a cosmos that keeps its secrets but reveals just enough to keep us intrigued. Each day that dawns is a celebration of the fact that we have been invited to consider how our lives are spent; how we embrace and recoil from the creative genesis of darkness, which is also light; and how we relate to others. One thing is certain: Our conflicts seem insignificant from the perspective of an expanding universe. As we struggle for justice, the universe invites us toward expanded options. We can incorporate the wonder of science in our liturgy and in our politics. We can strengthen and challenge theological precepts with information about the intricacies of a cosmos that defies our inclinations toward control. Finally, we can regard our differences as an intrinsic manifestation of a complex order.

The quantum world is all expectancy and potential, and it includes us whether we know it or not. In such a dynamic life space, we dare not weary of well doing. Although we continue to harm one another with our measurements of worth and assessments of shortcomings, we are peering into a glass darkly. For what we know and what we see are only shadows that cannot reflect the fullness of the cosmos or our place in it.  “

I had to double check the copyright 2002 date a couple of times as it seemed as if she was writing for today’s challenges. This only goes to prove that her powerful insights are timeless.

Survival

For over 40 years I have taught Teilhard’s breakthrough insights by using the film strip called Survival. Since the filmstrip was getting brittle and bulbs for the old projector hard to find I looked around for help to digitize it. That help came via Fr. Jim Brokman and Mount Mercy Univ. After researching for any impediments to doing that and finding none they did this for me. They found that I had one of two existing copies of this original filmstrip as people were advised to destroy them back in the early days when Teilhard was considered dangerous. This film strip makes Teilhard’s vision available to any alert 16 year old.  I have used in in workshops and retreat down through the years. Most recently I was invited to share it with the Institute of Noetic Sciences created by Edgar Mitchell after coming back from the moon.

Survival film strip remastered

1-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nAhp1JQ6bM

2-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcXb1ipVrAE

3-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcLWy8rX7LQ

4-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InLr64oa-a4          

No End to the Search

I consumed Mark Plaiss’ book No End to the Search in two days. Since I am a lay associate of New Melleray and Our Lady of the Mississpi Abbey’s I was eager to see how his experience of monasticism and mine compared. Mark writes as if he has a Go Pro on and he is just narrating what he is seeing and experiencing. If you want to explore this unique calling you will be rewarded in this book. The monks and nuns of these two monasteries have welcomed me into their worlds as best as anyone can welcome someone into their homes. Down through almost 40 years I have soaked up their wisdom and basked in their love. My goal continues to be to take the best of this experience into my life and let that season my relationships. Years ago Abbot General Dom Bernardo encouraged all Abbots and Abbesses to enter more deeply into dialogue with people like Mark and me. Out of this request grew a formal recognition by the Cistercian order to people attached to monasteries the world over. If you want to taste why we do this Mark will serve up a delightful menu, along with reflections on how this penetrates his daily life (and mine), so carve out some quiet time and sink into the quiet with No End to the Search.

Walkaway

Cory Doctorow’s novel Walkaway is for this hardly ever reader of novels a stretch. If it weren’t for the in-depth interview on Book TV I would never have been tempted to read it. The first chapter felt like reading something in a foreign language in a yet to be imagined space/time for this 81 year old great grandmother.

For over a year now I have been wearing one of our sons diaper pins or other safety pins on my clothes to remind myself that I cannot just drift off from the mess our generation has helped to create comforted by the thought that I will be ‘gone’ when the worst happens. I remind myself of all those who have to live with my choices in the years to come and then own my choices in a way that is painful at times. It is my way of walking toward the future that I will never see.

The growing recognition that the ways we currently use to find meaning are not working like we want them to. Articles on the demise of the nation state work with these same questions. Doctorow weaves in all the issues confronting us personally and corporately into a si-fi novel. He attempts to explore all the ways that those choosing to ‘walkaway’ use to create a reality that is worth living for. The age old quest for eternal life runs in the background in all their efforts. He creatively engages the human (meat stage) and post human stages. This was made possible by computer backups of people with the post human stage of emotions vs non emotions, which awaited the day these backups could be uploaded to a meat version again.

I will be ruminating a long time on this book. It was a slog for someone not used to novels yet alone si-fi ones, but it encourages me to see that others are looking for viable ways to move into the future.

The Church

Every now and then it is good to read a book like The Church: The Evolution of Catholicism. Richard McBrien is a reliable source for a comprehensive overview of catholic (with both a big C and little c) perspective. Even though published in 2008 it is a timely resource. In times of turmoil and rapid changes in so many areas of life the world over, I needed to reground myself in the big picture so as to see the ongoing process of growth that is being made in the hope of bringing into being the kingdom of God Jesus came to reveal. If you need to refresh your hope in the future this book might be for you.

The Exodus

The Exodus: How it happened and why it matters by Richard Elliott Friedman gives the reader an in-depth exploration of the pivotal moment in creation history as told by the bible. Friedman locates this experience as the one that sets humanity on the course of loving the alien or the other. This unique moment in history now clamors for attention when all over the world the struggle to recognize the humanity of the “other” is in desperate straits.  Never before has the human race faced this choice in the way we do now. We ignore it at our peril.

The Book of Joy

The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World is an effort by the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu mediated by Douglas Abrams. We are admitted into the inner worlds of these two experts on how to live with joy amidst a lifetime of suffering. The Dali Lama teaches that “The ultimate source of happiness is within us”. The Archbishop shares that “We grow in kindness when our kindness is tested.” They have walked the walk and now share this wisdom with all of us.

Learn to Receive

Learn to Receive by Soul Dancer (my baby brother) is aptly named a workbook on how to think it, feel it and live it. Soul has developed a method that can be used privately or more optimally by groups of people who want to dig deep into the ways we can balance our lives. It would be especially useful for anyone in a helping profession who tend to be better in giving than receiving and suffer burnout because of it. This work is the fruit of many years of guiding people in personal growth. Get your overalls and gloves on and get ready to work.

The Inner Experience

The Inner Experience: Notes on Contemplation by Thomas Merton.

Some of the pearls found in this work of Merton written just before he left for Asia where he died. The best estimation of when that was seems to be sometime in September 1959.

One of the strange laws of the contemplative life is that in it you do not sit down and solve problems: you bear with them until they somehow solve themselves. Pg.2 The contemplative life is primarily a life of unity. A contemplative is one who has transcended divisions to teach a unity beyond division. Pg. 147  The contemplative is not one who directs a magic spiritual intuition upon other objects, but one who, being perfectly unified in himself and recollected in the center of his own humility, enters into contact with reality by an immediacy that forgets the division between subject and object. Pg. 151.

It seem fitting that I finished it around 3:15, this Good Friday afternoon. Thank you Thomas

Quirky

Every now and then I come across a book that seems to be written just for me. Mellissa Schilling’s book Quirky was one of those books. I first came across her when listening to Book TV. As she described her interest in what she calls ‘quirky’ people it became clear that she has opened up a new and very productive vein of riches in studying these people down through recent history. I especially valued her insights about the common traits that identify such ‘quirky’ persons.

They challenge norms and paradigms and need time alone. Building self-efficacy seems inherent from early on and they often are inspired by grand ambitions. They excel in finding the ‘flow’ and are supported by having access to technological and intellectual resources often from unusual places and people. From experience I can affirm that living with quirky people can be very demanding. It isn’t for the faint of heart. But we are all the beneficiaries of such gifted ones.

A Brief History of Everything

A Brief History of Everything by Ken Wilber will stretch and challenge anyone willing to persevere in following his path. I just finished it tonight and got online to find this wonderful example of his thesis on my Facebook page. It is called:  Join the Conversation https://youtu.be/HyiVhrPz2o8               Some people in Dubuque, IA are coming together to make tangible the wisdom of the emergent energy in all creation.

Many are following in the footsteps of others who are responding to the ‘within’ (e.g. Teilhard) of reality after having plunged into the (e.g. Teilhard) ‘without’ dimension and found it necessary but incomplete.  Examples like John Haught’s “A New Cosmic Story” and Fr. Robert Beck’s “Jesus and his Enemies” are plowing this some of same ground.  I encourage those attracted to this emergent energy in all creation to take the pilgrimage with Wilber. You won’t be disappointed.

The Engram: A Christian Perspective

Richard Rohr and Andreas Ebert have collaborated    in “The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective” to add to the many efforts to introduce this time tested source of wisdom. I have learned painfully that I am in danger of making my worst mistakes when I was operating out of my “strengths”. The Enneagram helps to life up this issue in a way that helps bring to consciousness this danger. Then forewarned can truly be forearmed. The material is presented in a conversational manner making it easy to assimilate. If you don’t know much about this method of reflection this book would be a good place to start.

The Shepherd’s Life

The Shepherd’s Life is a book given to me for Christmas this year. The author, James Rebanks, took me along as he journaled his way through the four seasons of the year. I found his attempt to hold together the tension of the old and the new way of being in the world a creative endeavor. I suspect that many ways of being in the world today are wrestling with this same tension. How does one live with the wisdom of the ages and yet be open to what is revealing itself in this rapidly changing environment? I suspect the advent of the alphabet, the printing press, the industrial expansion were but a few examples of this same struggle. Yet, maybe we face an existential crisis radically new to any that have been faced before. This time, either by our own devices, or by the cumulative effect of ignorant/uncaring choices a do-over might not be possible. It behooves all of us to reflect deeply about what we must do to live within this dynamic. The future depends that we care as deeply ans Rebanks does.

The Return of the Prodigal Son

The Return of the Prodigal Son by Henri Nouwen is a book I have heard about for years and now have read. It touched me deeply at this point of my life as an octogenarian. I remember experiencing Henri at a conference where he was a plenary speaker. He brought Adam with him and positioned him on stage for all of us to meet. It was obvious how closely bonded they were. Henri’s exploration of the various people in the parable helped me to join him as I look back over my life and the process of spiritual growth it contains. This book is a timeless classic and if you only read one of Henri’s books I advise starting with this one.  Published by Image Books in 1992.