And Man Created God

Selina O’Grady has written a fascinating book called And Man Created God. It is a review of the world religions at the time of Jesus. Although Selina comes at the subject as a non believer, she is another voice that adds to the many who try to situate Jesus, Paul and the early church in their context. I came away from this book bewildered by the chaotic milieu of religions that the people of Jesus’ day must have found oppressive. When given the chance to hear about God from Jesus, the disciples and Paul I can easily see why their words were indeed “good news”.

Paul: A Novel

Walter Wangerin, a masterful storyteller, has used his skill once again in crafting a very engaging novel called Paul: A Novel. In it he uses scripture to bring us along with those early believers who faced terrible odds as they birthed Christianity. This is a book that will enlarge your gratitude for the risks they took for all of us.

Rediscover Catholicism

If you want to read a popular book that attempts to address the problem of people loosing their zest for sharing their Catholic faith read Rediscover Catholicism. On page 23, Matthew Kelly lays out his insight in the following words: “If we live and love the way the Gospel invites us to, we will intrigue people. Respect and cherish your spouse and children, and people will be intrigued. Work hard and pay attention to the details of your work, and you will intrigue people. God out of your way to help those in need, people will be intrigued. When we do what is right even if it comes at a great cost to ourselves, people are intrigued. Patience, kindness, humility, gratitude, thoughtfulness, generosity, courage and forgiveness are all intriguing.”

Mind in the Balance

If you are interested in the interface between Christianity and Buddhism in the dialogue between science and religion, this may be the book for you. Mind in the Balance examines the history of meditation in both these traditions of belief. B. Alan Wallace explores the subject of mind, intelligence, spirit and reason. His  insights from modern science helps to engage those who feel that they are “spiritual” but not “religious”.

Understanding the Dead Sea Scrolls

 Understanding the Dead Sea Scrolls by Hershel Shanks, Random House, NY. 1992.
Hershel Shanks who is the editor of The Biblical Archaeology Review and the Bible Review, has given us this overview of the dialogue on the Dead Sea Scrolls. He presents thirteen scholars and their considered evaluation of these documents. The book begins telling the story of how and where they were found. Then he moves on to examine their relationship to Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity and the Bible in general. Finally, there is a look at the methods used to reconstruct the scrolls and their impact on the scholars themselves. If you want to enlarge your understanding of these important documents, this readable book will enable you to do just that.

Cosmology and Creation

Cosmology and Creation by Paul Brockelman Many have said we need a new story to bring together the scientific and spiritual understandings of life so that our young may live whole lives again. This book is one of the many that attempts to lay out the chapters of such a story. This new story needs to help us rediscover the spiritual insights and practices lying at the core of  all the world’s religious traditions. It will help us connect our spiritual and scientific experiences in a way that opens the wonder of awe once again. This new story is not an enemy of the human spirit, but an expression of it.

The Beginning of All Things

Hans Kung has given us, what in effect is his life testament in The Beginning of all Things: Science and Religion. In it he concludes: “This is my enlightened, well – founded hope: dying is a farewell inward, and entry and homecoming into the ground and origin of the world, our true home, a farewell perhaps not without pain and anxiety, but hopefully in composure and surrender, at any rate without weeping and wailing, and without bitterness and despair, but rather in hopeful expectation, quiet certainty, and (after everything that has to be settled is settled) ashamed gratitude for all the good things and less good things that now finally and definitively lie behind us – thank God.” He gathers up a life time of study and reflection and brings us up to date on the dialogue between science and religion so that we can be both/and people like Jesus of Nazareth.

The Great Emergence

A provocative book “The Great Emergence” by Phyllis Tickle attempts to examine the ways religion has changed and is changing today.  She especially examines Christianity in what is known as the Western world. She finds that about every 500 years, a shift happens and the old paradigm bursts and a new way of being Christian in the world emerges out of its chrysalis and the new ‘butterfly’ takes flight. I found this examination useful and set me to wondering and watching to see what will emerge.

The Future of Faith

A provocative read is The Future of Faith. by Harvey Cox. He reflects on Christian history and speculates on Christian future. His premise is that we are entering into what he calls the age of the Spirit, having gone through ages of faith and belief. He says: “Today there is no basis for any “warfare between science and religion.” The two have quite different but complementary missions, the first concerning itself with empirical description, the second with meaning and values. Unfortunately, however, although the war is over, sporadic skirmishes between die-hards on both sides continue. Biblical literalists, who totally misunderstand the poetry of the book of Genesis, try to reduce it to a treatise in geology and zoology. Their mirror image is found among the atheists and agnostics who mount spurious pseudoscientific arguments to demonstrate that the universe has no meaning or that God does not exist. Both parties are fundamentalists of a sort, deficient in their capacity for metaphor, analogy, and the place of symbol and myth in human life. Sadly, battle lines that were drawn years ago continue to cause confusion today. Otherwise thoughtful people still mistakenly view the world as divided between “believers” and “nonbelievers.” But that era of human consciousness is almost over. We are witnessing the emergence of a different vocabulary, one that is closer to the original sense of the word “faith” before its debasement. Pgs. 182-3.”

Judaism

If you want to explore Judaism, a good place to start would be Judaism by Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg. The subtitle is: The Classic Introduction to One of the Great Religions of the Modern World.  This is the product of a lifetime of study and reflection by one of the most distinguished authorities on Judaism.